Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Most popular Latin phrases and sayings in the logfile...

 
For what it's worth, here is a list of Latin phrases most commonly searched for, according to my data. The first one is apparently due to the fact that a new movie with Angelina Jolie is currently playing in the theaters. I realize that this data mostly reflects the popular phrases that are better covered on my site, but at this point I don't know how else I can get more reliable statistics without spending hours searching through various search engine data.

Quod me nutrit me destruit - What nourishes me also destroys me.
Sic transit gloria mundi - Thus passes away the glory of this world.
Simplex commendatio non obligat - A simple recommendation does not bind.
Assignatus utitur jure auctoris - An assignee is clothed with rights of his assignor.
Deus et patria - God and the country.
Qui potest capere capiat - Let him accept it who can.
Amare et sapere vix deo conceditur - Even a god finds it hard to love and be wise at the same time.
Nemo punitur pro alieno delicto - No one is to be punished for the. crime or wrong of another.
Vitanda est improba siren desidia - One must avoid that wicked temptress, Laziness. (Horace).
Lex non favet delicatorum votis - An action does not lie because of a trifling inconvenience, which would only be regarded as such by the dainty.

Propertius' love elegies

 
Saturday, December 1, 2007, 18:27 - Latin Translation
Posted by Administrator
Added a few lines from Propertius to the Love Poems page. He is quite good, but sometimes gets a little too racy. For now, I will stay away from a few of his elegies. I am all too mindful what 'carmen et error' did to Ovid...

Latin Love poetry

Italian and Spanish through Latin

 
Saturday, December 1, 2007, 14:14 - Latin Derivatives, Roots, Word Origins, Learn Latin Language
Posted by Administrator
It took me some time to find a document that neatly summarizes everything one needs to know pertaining to learning Italian through Latin. They also threw in Spanish, but I won't complain :) To locate this PDF I had to actually search for something like clamo chiamo Latin Italian, thus proving the old (Platonic, in a sense) idea that one can only learn something that he/she already knows.

Note: this is a PDF document, so it is best to save it, or at least open directly in Acrobat. My computer sometimes freezes while opening PDFs in a browser window.

http://roserwilliams.com/Spanish%20and% ... 0Latin.pdf

She flies with her own wings

 
Thursday, November 29, 2007, 20:53 - Latin Language, Latin Translation, Popular Latin Phrases, Mottos, Slogans, State mottos
Posted by Administrator
Alis volat propriis
She flies with her own wings


I am becoming more convinced that if one wants to adopt a good motto it is best to start with a classical quotation. Reasons? See above - the Oregon state motto. I was not able to find any related quotation in the body of Latin literature, both classical and medieval.

Honestly, would it make much sense if someone attempted to fly not by her or his own wings? What does this even mean? Is it a sign of some great achievement, to fly with your own wings? It's like speaking with your own voice and so on. I suppose this reveals some degree of self-sufficiency, but not exactly enough to be perceived as a personal trait that would get you noticed...

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