Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Latin language and the vicinities, painting of Rome


The majority of texts and materials on this site have something to do with the Latin language, including its perception and use in popular culture (Latin quotes, tattoos, mottos, engravings, inscriptions etc). Among the highlights are a free Latin Dictionary Assistant (a Windows interface for W. Whitaker's "Latin Words"), Latin Love poems, a Latin Motto Generator, Latin quotes & phrases, Antique engraved rings, and Legal Latin phrases, quotes & writs. Enjoy!


Free PHI 5.3 (Collection of Latin texts from the Packard Humanities Institute)!

 
Tuesday, November 4, 2008, 20:17 - Books, dictionaries and texts, Software
Posted by Administrator
PHI 5.3 is a Latin language equivalent of Thesaurus Linguae Graecae. This package used to be licensed at a small cost to individuals. Not many people know this , but currently PHI 5.3 (as well as PHI 7) can be obtained freely from the Packard Humanities Institute. Here is a quote from the License Agreement:

These materials are intended for non-commercial scholarly use by universities and scholars. The CD ROMs are being made available by means of a license agreement with an indefinite term. The fact that we offer this license at no charge (including shipping & handling costs) reflects PHI's desire that the texts on the discs be available to all interested scholars and institutions for educational purposes.

A brief description:

PHI currently offers two CD ROMs of classical texts:
PHI CD #5.3 ("Latin", issued 1991) contains virtually all classical Latin literature through A.D. 200, together with a few later texts (e.g. Servius, Porphyry, Zeno, Justinian). As an extra bonus we have also included the following versions of the Bible: Hebrew, Septuagint, Greek and Coptic New Testaments, Latin Vulgate, King James, and RSV.
PHI CD #7 ("Greek Documentary", issued 1997) contains (1) documentary papyri prepared at Duke University with the help of the University of Michigan; (2) Greek inscriptions prepared at Cornell, Ohio State University, et al.; and (3) a Coptic New Testament prepared at Yale and the Nag Hammadi texts as prepared at the University of Claremont.


For everybody's convenience I am making the License agreement and the Order form available here (I have the Packard Humanities Institute's permission, of course):

PHI files


The best thing about PHI is that the texts are often taken from the best editions and their quality is quite impressive. This is not your usual TheLatinLibrary.com stuff which is all too often unusable for any serious reader of Classical texts.
Keep in mind, that you need to also find some software that is capable of displaying the text found on PHI CDs as well as Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG). I would recommend Musaios or Diogenes.

Quotes about money (in Latin with English translations)

 
Friday, October 31, 2008, 15:23 - Best Latin Quotes, Words of Wisdom, Proverbs and Sayings
Posted by Administrator
Some quotes that have to do with money, success (and the lack therof), wealth and human nature in general.

Abite nummi, ego vos mergam, ne mergar a vobis - Away with you, money, I will sink you that I may not be sunk by you
Absque argento omnia vana - Without money all is in vain
Cornucopia - Horn of plenty
Crescit amor nummi, quantum ipsa pecunia crevit - The love of wealth grows as the wealth itself grew. (Juvenalis)
Corruptio optimi pessima - Corruption of the best is worst
Dira necessitas - The dire necessity. (Horace)
Dominus providebit - The Lord will provide
Faber est suae quisque fortunae - Every man is the artisan of his own fortune. (Appius Claudius Caecus)
Fames est optimus coquus - Hunger is the best cook
Homo doctus is se semper divitias habet - A learned man always has wealth within himself
In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas - In necessary things unity, in doubtful things liberty, in all things charity
In omnia paratus - Prepared for all things
Libra solidus denarius (L.S.D.) - Pounds, shillings, pence
Magnas inter opes inops - A pauper in the midst of wealth. (Horace)
Male parta male dilabuntur - What has been wrongly gained is wrongly lost.(Cicero)
Nervos belli, pecuniam. (Nervus rerum.) - The nerve of war, money. (The nerve of things.) (Cicero)
Nihil tam munitum quod non expugnari pecunia possit - No fort is so strong that it cannot be taken with money. (Cicero)
Pecunia non olet - Money has no smell. Money doesn't stink. (don't look a gift horse in the mouth) (Vespasianus)
Pecuniate obediunt omnia - All things obey money
Radix omnium malorum est cupiditas - The love of money is the root of all evil. Avarice is the problem, money itself is not evil
Semper inops quicumque cupit - Whoever desires is always poor. (Claudian)


Semper fidelis and beyond. Latin phrases that contain the word "semper"

 
A classic 20th century Russian novel by Ilf and Petrov entitled "The Twelve Chairs" contains a verbal exchange, highly humorous, in my opinion, between a con artist trying to raise money, supposedly for the needs of the anti-Bolshevik underground, and a small town fellow, sympathetic to the cause:

"What's your political credo?"
"Always!" repliied Polesov delightedly.

I do not remember if this scene is present in Mel Brooks 1970 adaptation of the novel. Regardless, the point is that the word "always" (semper in Latin) possesses a very high level of appeal when it comes to indicating one's allegiance to something.

Acceptissima semper // munera sunt, auctor quae pretiosa facit - Those gifts are always the most acceptable which our love for the donor makes precious (Ovid)

Conlige suspectos semper habitos - Round up the usual suspects

Cotidie damnatur qui semper timet - The man who is constantly in fear is every day condemned. (Syrus)

Credula vitam spes fovet et melius cras fore semper dicit - Credulous hope supports our life, and always says that tomorrow will be better. (Tibullus)

Crudelius est quam mori semper timere mortem - It is more cruel to always fear death than to die. (Seneca)

De duobus malis, minus est semper eligendum - Of two evils, the lesser must always be chosen (Thomas a Kempis)

Fama semper vivat - May his/her fame last forever

Hoc natura est insitum, ut quem timueris, hunc semper oderis - It's an innate thing to always hate the one we've learnt to fear

Non semper erit aestas - It will not always be summer (be prepared for hard times)

Rosa rubicundior, lilio candidior, omnibus formosior, semper in te glorior - Redder than the rose, whiter than the lilies, fairer than everything, I will always have glory in thee

Semper fidelis - Always faithful

Semper idem - Always the same thing. (Cicero)

Semper inops quicumque cupit - Whoever desires is always poor. (Claudian)

Semper letteris mandate - Always get it in writing!

Semper paratus - Always prepared

Semper superne nitens - Always striving upwards


"The Christ Bowl" - a sad excuse for biblical archaeology

 


A team of scientists led by renowned French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio recently announced that they have found a bowl, dating to between the late 2nd century B.C. and the early 1st century A.D., that is engraved with what they believe could be the world's first known reference to Christ.
...
The full engraving on the bowl reads, "DIA CHRSTOU O GOISTAIS," which has been interpreted by the excavation team to mean either, "by Christ the magician" or, "the magician by Christ."


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26972493/

Well, first of all I would really like to see the other side of the bowl... But let us look at what's available:

DIAXRHCTOU

Christ in Greek is normally spelled XRICTOC, but I have found a few inscriptions where H is used.However, XPHCTOC is also an adjective meaning 'excellent', 'meek', 'useful', 'noble'. This alone significantly increases the number of interpretations of the inscription.

But what I would REALLY like to see is what stands for O GOISTAIS. The Greek word they have in mind must be GOHC (charlatan, magician), but what is GOISTAIS???

If there is a Bible reference here, it is best to interpret GOISTAIS as Gestas, one of the thieves who were crucified next to Christ. :) Then the inscription makes total sense grammatically:

"Gestas, Through Christ"

It is known, of course, that it was Dismas, not Gesmas who was saved by Jesus. So, the inscription must imply that early Christians believed that God's compassion is so great that even the foolish taunter of Christ eventually received pardon and salvation. Trust me, this interpretation is no worse that the "magic" one, but at least I am not making a big deal out of it!

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