Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Quod me nutrit me destruit (What nourishes me also destroys me) -- Angelina Jolie's Tattoo

 
Angelina Jolie tattoo

To the best of my knowledge, this motto can be found in two places: on a portrait that is believed to be of Chistopher Marlowe, and on Angelina Jolie's belly (or thereabouts). The more familiar version of this motto is Qui me alit me extinguit - Who feeds me also extinguishes me. One emblematist in particular, Paolo Giovio (Paulus Jovius) gives quod alit etc. This version, most likely taken from an English rendition of Jovius' work by Samuel Daniel, can be also find in Shakespeare. Here is the complete entry from Daniel regarding this motto:

An amorous gentleman of Milan bare in his standard a torch figured burning and turning downward, whereby the melting wax, falling in great abundance, quencheth the flame; with this posy thereunto: Quod me alit me extinguit, alluding to a Lady whose beauty did foster his love and whose disdain did endamage his life.
The choice of a motto slightly varying in its wording (as found above or below, whichever the case may be) must be attributed to the desire to be original. At any rate, I would just like to note that in the same book there is another story with similar connotations:

A certain Gentleman having espoused a noble and virtuous wife, caused her to wear for her Impresa a Snail closed in here shell, as she remaineth all the winter, to defend her from the cold, with this posy, Proprio alitur succo: to signify that she should satisfie herself with the love of her own husband, even as the snail is nourished with her own moisture.

Proprio alitur succo - nourished with her own moisture. Pretty weird and disturbing in its own way... Anyway, just a thought, in case Angelina ever desires to tie the knot. This tattoo would go well with the one that she has. I will refrain from recommendations as to the placing of this motto on her ever so valuable real estate.

  permalink   |  related link

Gods in color - painted ancient sculpture exhibit

 
Saturday, November 10, 2007, 09:03 - Fine Arts, World History: Ancient, Medieval & Modern, Reviews
Posted by Administrator

image from http://blog.lib.umn.edu/jrock2/rockblog/

An outstanding exhibit (organized by the Stiftung Archäologie and the Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, Munich), presently at Harvard. It is well-known that the white color, so familiar to any student of antiquity, was not at all a feature of classical Greek and Roman art. Instead, sculptures and buildings were routinely painted. Traces of various pigments can still be detected, which allowed this beautiful set of reconstructions to be created, displaying the full color of ancient sculpture. I was unable to find any images that would even remotely convey these bright vibrant colors. This exhibit must be seen in person!

http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/exhib ... Color.html
  permalink   |  related link

Temple Church inscription

 
Ah, mysteries...

I decided to revisit a little mystery about an inscription on the church at Temple (not far from Rosslyn, if I am not mistaken).
The inscription can be seen in all its high-resolution glory here:
http://www.maknap.com/MysteryTV/history ... /STONE.JPG

A gentleman by the name of Jeff Nisbet attempted to prove that VAESAC stands for CAUSAE, and that MIHM stands for something like Maria Iesus Heres Magdalen (sic). The letters RI that one might believe are seen on the other side of the stone were interpreted by him as somehow referring to the Templars' pre-columbian voyages to America.

That sort of thing is enough to make one's brain hurt... Nevertheless, I found some additional information about this inscription in Notes and Queries (where else?).

In 1901 N&Q republished a note from Daily News:

The late Duchess of Cleveland, while Lady Dalmeny, was (says a correspondent) very much interested by the inscription, which has never been satisfactorily explained, which in letters of lead is on the stone of the belfry of the ruined ancient church of Temple, just outside the boundary of the Rosebery property in Midlothian. It reads thus: 'Vaesac Mihm." Daily News, 20 May.

Can any one suggest an explanation?
C.C.B.


In a few months this reply was received (9th S. VIII Aug.10, 1901):

Vaesac Mihm (9th S. viii. 45) - I believe that the inscription leaded into one of the corner stones in the east gable bellow the belfry of the old church at Temple reads

V.AE.S.A.C
M.I.H.M

There is a somewhat similar inscription, with a date on a stone in the gable of the very old stone-roofed portion of the church of Abercorn in Linlithgowshire, this: -
D.D.I.D.
M.H.I.M. 1612

J.L. Anderson


I find it interesting that these people, who undoubtedly saw the inscription in a better condition than it is today, did not note the letters RI that some believe exist now.

Other than that I can only honestly say that for a fee I am willing to produce absolutely any imaginable interpretation of the inscriptions above.

How to read books in Latin

 
Friday, November 9, 2007, 14:39 - Books, dictionaries and texts, Latin Language, Reviews, Software
Posted by Administrator
Obviously, you need to know Latin. There is no cutting corners here, and this is not what I am going to discuss. Instead, I will share my experiences with paperless books. Classicists are particularly blessed with a large number of Latin texts available free of charge on the Internet. It would be ridiculous to even talk about the many sites where you can download Virgil, Ovid, Catullus, Cicero, Sallust - you name it. For years I have been using Casio E100 - probably the first full color PDA that every came out (Windows CE). I still have it and it works great, except there is just not enough memory (16mb) and dealing with serial connections in the world of USB is kinda silly. So, not too long ago I upgraded to T-Moble MDA (aka HTC Wizard, if I am not mistaken) - A Windows Mobile device. I have a 2gb card in it, so there is a lot of space for my books. I also have a 4gb card, but apparently I have to wait for a firmware update in order for MDA to support mini SD cards over 2 gb. Something about the limitations of the file system... Anyway, I use a program called Haali Reader. It supports a lot of different formats. You can even open compressed files with it. Of course, there are many readers out there, and I have a few of them installed on my MDA: Mobipocket, AlReader. However, Haali has one very neat feature. You can make a simple dictionary and go to it with a tap of a stylus (or a finger, really) if you just can't remember some rare word. I don't have a very good Latin dictionary in plain text format, but I used one of those wordlists that have been floating around for years. It's been somewhat helpful, although personally I would not mind some "real" Latin dictionary. Maybe I will compile something one day using one of the old Latin dictionaries that are starting to appear in the public domain.

Now, there is also a program called Antiquarium which is supposed to work on any Windows Mobile device with TLG and PHI. I am a lucky owner of PHI (and so should be anyone who is into Latin at all, because it only cost me $50). Unfortunately, the demo version of Antiquarium for Windows Mobile did not seem to work on my device.

So, that's the present. In the future I hope to upgrade to one of the Sony Readers. Like the currently available Sony PRS-500 Portable Reader System. I am not too crazy about the quality, but I am sure it will improve. Most likely, I will wait for a technological breakthrough, just like in the case with Casio E100. The biggest advantage of this device would be easy access to PDF files. This would probably solve all my ebooks-related problems once and for all.

<<First <Back | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | Next> Last>>





Privacy Policy