Philosophy

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


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Philosophic terminology in Latin

 
Sunday, February 8, 2009, 01:41 - Latin Translation, Latin Words - Meanings and Definitions, Philosophy
Posted by Administrator
I have published a first pass of a new word list: Philosophical terminology in Latin. It would is a nearly impossible task to come up with a comprehensive dictionary of Latin terms used in any particular setting. Philosophical Latin is highly technical and individual philosophers often adapted existing terms for their own needs. Still, it is my hope that this wordlist will be useful to someone just starting to read philosophic works in the original Latin. Most of these terms were used in medieval texts, because Ancient Rome never matched Greece as a center of philosophic studies. Roman philosophy was rather eclectic, even at its best (Lucretius, for example). This list of terms (over 500 entries!) generally only includes individual words and notions, leaving aside common sayings such as "Cogito ergo sum" etc. I am considering making a separate list of such phrases.

Philosophy: Latin terms with translations.


Latin Quotes About Life (and inevitably about death...)

 
Due to increased demand, here is a fairly representable selection of Latin quotes about life. Naturally, the ancients rarely thought of life without brining death into the equasion.


Ad vitam paramus - We are preparing for life
Amor est vitae essentia - Love is the essence of life. (Robert B. Mackay)
Ampliat aetatis spatium sibi vir bonus; hoc est vivere bis vita posse priore frui – The good man extends the period of his life; it is to live twice, to enjoy with satisfaction the retrospect of our past life. (Martial)
Aqua vitae - Water of life
Ars longa, vita brevis - Art (work) is long, but life is short
Avarus, nisi cum poritur, nil recte facit – A miser, until he dies, does nothing right
Bis vivit qui bene vivit - He lives twice who lives well
Brevis ipsa vita est sed malis fit longior - Our life is short but is made longer by misfortunes. (Publilius Syrus)
Conveniens vitae mors fuit ista suae – That was a death conformable to his life. (Ovid)
Credula vitam spes fovet et melius cras fore semper dicit - Credulous hope supports our life, and always says that tomorrow will be better. (Tibullus)
Cum dubia et fragilis sit nobis vita tributa, in morte alterius spem to tibi ponere noli – Seeing that life has been given us precarious and full of uncertainty, fix not your hopes on the death of another. (Cato)
Curriculum vitae - The course of one's life
Dum inter homines sumus, colamus humanitatem - As long as we are among humans, let us be humane. (Seneca)
Dum spiramus tuebimur - While we breathe, we shall defend
Dum spiro, spero - While I breathe, I hope. (Cicero)
Dum tempus habemus, operemur bonum - While we have the time, let us do good
Dum vita est spes est - While life is, hope is. / While there is life there is hope
Dum vivimus, vivamus - While we live, let us live (Epicurean philosophy)
Fama semper vivat - May his/her fame last forever
Historia est vitae magistra - The history is the tutor of life
Integer vitae scelerisque purus - Blameless of life and free from crime
Luctor et emergo - I struggle but I'll survive
Memento vivere - A reminder of life (literally remember that you have to live)
Nec possum tecum vivere, nec sine te - I am able to live / I can live neither with you, nor without you. (Martial)
Non ignara mali, miseris succurrere disco - No stranger to misfortune [myself, F.] I learn to relieve the sufferings [of others
Non scholae sed vitae discimus - We do not learn for school, but for life. (Seneca)
Primum viveri deinde philosophari - Live before you philosophize, or Leap before you look
Quod differtur, non aufertur - That which is postponed is not dropped. Inevitable is yet to happen. (Sir Thomas More)
Quod incepimus conficiemus - What we have begun we shall finish
Tamdiu discendum est, quamdiu vivas - We should learn as long as we may live. (We live and learn.) (Seneca Philosophus)
Victoria et pro victoria vita – Victory, and for victory life
Victoria, et per victoriam vita – Victory, and through victory life
Vita mutatur, non tollitur - Life is changed, not taken away
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est - Life is more than merely staying alive
Vita sine libris mors est - Life without books is death
Vita turpis ne morti quidem honestae colum relinquit – A life of shame leaves no room even for an honorable death. (Cicero)
Vitam impendere vero - To risk one's life for the truth
Vitam regit fortuna, non sapientia - Fortune, not wisdom, rules lives. (Cicero)
Viva enim mortuorum in memoria vivorum est posita – The life of the dead is retained in the memory of the living. (Cicero)
Vivat, crescat, floreat! - May he/she/it live, grow, and flourish!
Vive hodie - Live today (not tomorrow)
Vive ut vivas - Live that you may live
Vivere commune est, sed non commune mereri - Everybody lives; not everybody deserves to
Vivere disce, cogita mori - Learn to live; Remember death. (sundial inscription)
Vivos voco, mortuos plango- I call the living, I mourn the dead. (church bell inscription)
Vixit - He/she has lived

Know thyself!

 
Today I read a claim that the famous saying inscribed above one of the entrances into the shrine of the Delphic oracle (γνωθι σεαυτόν, "Know thyself", rendered in Latin as Nosce te ipsum) does not actually contain an invitation to introspection, but rather suggests that a man must be aware of being mortal. I think the introspection reading is a lot more fun!

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