Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Semper fidelis and beyond. Latin phrases that contain the word "semper"

 
A classic 20th century Russian novel by Ilf and Petrov entitled "The Twelve Chairs" contains a verbal exchange, highly humorous, in my opinion, between a con artist trying to raise money, supposedly for the needs of the anti-Bolshevik underground, and a small town fellow, sympathetic to the cause:

"What's your political credo?"
"Always!" repliied Polesov delightedly.

I do not remember if this scene is present in Mel Brooks 1970 adaptation of the novel. Regardless, the point is that the word "always" (semper in Latin) possesses a very high level of appeal when it comes to indicating one's allegiance to something.

Acceptissima semper // munera sunt, auctor quae pretiosa facit - Those gifts are always the most acceptable which our love for the donor makes precious (Ovid)

Conlige suspectos semper habitos - Round up the usual suspects

Cotidie damnatur qui semper timet - The man who is constantly in fear is every day condemned. (Syrus)

Credula vitam spes fovet et melius cras fore semper dicit - Credulous hope supports our life, and always says that tomorrow will be better. (Tibullus)

Crudelius est quam mori semper timere mortem - It is more cruel to always fear death than to die. (Seneca)

De duobus malis, minus est semper eligendum - Of two evils, the lesser must always be chosen (Thomas a Kempis)

Fama semper vivat - May his/her fame last forever

Hoc natura est insitum, ut quem timueris, hunc semper oderis - It's an innate thing to always hate the one we've learnt to fear

Non semper erit aestas - It will not always be summer (be prepared for hard times)

Rosa rubicundior, lilio candidior, omnibus formosior, semper in te glorior - Redder than the rose, whiter than the lilies, fairer than everything, I will always have glory in thee

Semper fidelis - Always faithful

Semper idem - Always the same thing. (Cicero)

Semper inops quicumque cupit - Whoever desires is always poor. (Claudian)

Semper letteris mandate - Always get it in writing!

Semper paratus - Always prepared

Semper superne nitens - Always striving upwards


"The Christ Bowl" - a sad excuse for biblical archaeology

 


A team of scientists led by renowned French marine archaeologist Franck Goddio recently announced that they have found a bowl, dating to between the late 2nd century B.C. and the early 1st century A.D., that is engraved with what they believe could be the world's first known reference to Christ.
...
The full engraving on the bowl reads, "DIA CHRSTOU O GOISTAIS," which has been interpreted by the excavation team to mean either, "by Christ the magician" or, "the magician by Christ."


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26972493/

Well, first of all I would really like to see the other side of the bowl... But let us look at what's available:

DIAXRHCTOU

Christ in Greek is normally spelled XRICTOC, but I have found a few inscriptions where H is used.However, XPHCTOC is also an adjective meaning 'excellent', 'meek', 'useful', 'noble'. This alone significantly increases the number of interpretations of the inscription.

But what I would REALLY like to see is what stands for O GOISTAIS. The Greek word they have in mind must be GOHC (charlatan, magician), but what is GOISTAIS???

If there is a Bible reference here, it is best to interpret GOISTAIS as Gestas, one of the thieves who were crucified next to Christ. :) Then the inscription makes total sense grammatically:

"Gestas, Through Christ"

It is known, of course, that it was Dismas, not Gesmas who was saved by Jesus. So, the inscription must imply that early Christians believed that God's compassion is so great that even the foolish taunter of Christ eventually received pardon and salvation. Trust me, this interpretation is no worse that the "magic" one, but at least I am not making a big deal out of it!

Main gods and goddesses of the Greek and Roman mythology - a memory game

 
Tuesday, August 26, 2008, 22:26 - Ancient Greek Language, Software, World History: Ancient, Medieval & Modern, Mythology
Posted by Administrator
Just added:

Greek and Roman Gods and Goddesses: a Memory game

I only had enough room for the main deities. Conveniently enough, there were twelve "spots", just enough for all the Olympian gods. The original Greek names and the Roman equivalents are included. Perhaps some students will find this useful.

See also:
Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Hebrew Alphabet Game

 
Wednesday, August 20, 2008, 18:17 - Software
Posted by Administrator
It would have been a shame not to reuse the code from the Greek alphabet game to make a Hebrew alphabet app! My hebrew is virtually non-existent, but I don't think I made any major mistakes :)

Hebrew Alphabet Game

When I get a chance I might use this code to make more alphabet learning tools for non-Latin scripts, but I don't really have anything specific in mind at this point.

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