Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Of arms and the man I sing - a trifle of numerology

 
The number of books in Homer's "Iliad": 24.
The number of books in Homer's "Odyssey": 24

The number of words in the opening passage of Virgil's Aeneid, the poem justly believed to incorporate the themes of Homer's two great epic works: 48 (24+24).


Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris
Italiam fato profugus Laviniaque venit
litora, multum ille et terris iactatus et alto
vi superum, saevae memorem Iunonis ob iram,
multa quoque et bello passus, dum conderet urbem
inferretque deos Latio; genus unde Latinum
Albanique patres atque altae moenia Romae.


See also:
Roman numerals in numerology

Knowledge is power - original source of the quote

 
Sunday, February 10, 2008, 14:08 - Books, dictionaries and texts, Popular Latin Phrases, Mottos, Slogans
Posted by Administrator
This maxim attributed to Francis Bacon is very often quoted as Scientia est potentia. Perhaps a little too inspired by this motto, I decided to gain knowledge about the original quote, and, to my surprise, found none. There is this phrase, however, used very much passingly and literally parenthetically in De Haeresibus: (nam & ipsa scientia potestas est). But, I suppose, this phrase expresses the gist of Bacon's philosophy better than any other. Still, it should be probably quoted a little closer to the source: Scientia potestas est. Also, potestas sounds a bit more classical, at least to my ear.


Philip Pullman's book titles

 
Friday, February 8, 2008, 11:54 - Books, dictionaries and texts, Jokes and anecdotes
Posted by Administrator
The Amber Spyglass
The Golden Compass
The Subtle Knife...


"The Subtle Knife"??? Am I the only one who finds this title hilarious? I could not resist coming up with a few good and solid book titles for Mr. Pullman:

"The Indignant Crayon"
"The Voracious Chronometer"
"The Pliant Inkwell"
"The Learned Kettle"
"The Knotted Street Map"
"The Capricious Thermos"
"The Flamboyant Screwdriver"

British motto contest, sponsored by The Times

 
Friday, February 8, 2008, 11:09 - Popular Latin Phrases, Mottos, Slogans, State mottos
Posted by Administrator
I can't believe this one almost escaped my attention!

The article is appropriately entitled Britain Seeks Its Essence, and Finds Punch Lines.

It was a lofty idea: formulate a British “statement of values” defining what it means to be British, much the way a document like the Declaration of Independence sets out the ideals that help explain what it means to be American.
...
The proposal, part of a package of British-pride-bolstering measures announced by Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s new government over the summer, raised a host of tricky questions. What does it mean to be British? How do you express it in a country that believes self-promotion to be embarrassing? And how do you deal with a defining trait of the people you are trying to define: their habit of making fun of worthy government proposals?

Detractors spread the rumor that the government was looking not for a considered statement, but for a snappy, pithy “liberté, égalité, fraternité”-style slogan that it could plaster across government buildings in a kind of branding exercise.

Nor did it help when The Times of London cynically sponsored a British motto-writing contest for its readers.

The readers’ suggestions included “Dipso, Fatso, Bingo, Asbo, Tesco” (Asbo stands for “anti-social behavior order,” a law-enforcement tool, while Tesco is a ubiquitous supermarket chain); “Once Mighty Empire, Slightly Used”; “At Least We’re Not French”; and “We Apologize for the Inconvenience.” The winner, favored by 20.9 percent of the readers, was “No Motto Please, We’re British.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/26/world ... motto.html
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