Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Latin word for death

 
Wednesday, February 11, 2015, 15:48 - Latin Words - Meanings and Definitions
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As all highly advanced and well developed languages, Latin has a good number of words that can be rendered as "death" in a modern English translation. In certain cases specific Latin words convey additional meanings, while some only create a small variation in style. However, in a vast majority of situations the most generic Latin word for "death" works well: mors. If you are unfamiliar with Latin, it is important to know that depending on context this word will appear somewhat differently: mortis, mortem. morte and so on. Latin words simply have more grammatical forms that words in modern English. The following list, I hope, is a fairly comprehensive run-down of most words that can also be used, according to the intent and style of the text. Note that for each word there are two forms given, as it is also the practice in most dictionaries. The first form is the Nominative case, in which a noun would be used for purposes of a simple statement. If you need to find a phrase about death, try looking at this list of sad phrases in Latin.

mors, mortis - death; corpse; annihilation;
fatum, fati - utterance, oracle; fate, destiny; natural term of life; doom, death, calamity;
funus, funeris - burial, funeral; funeral rites; ruin; corpse; death;
nex, necis - death; murder;
letum, leti - death, ruin, annihilation; death and destruction;
exitium, exiti(i) - destruction, ruin; death; mischief;
obitus, obitus - death (naturally from old age), visit
excessus, excessus - death (a rather polite and formal way of saying it), departure

Her-story strikes back

 
Monday, September 22, 2014, 22:47 - Ancient Greek Language, Etymology and word roots
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There is a well-known and obviously playful etymological explanation of the word "history" -- "his story," naturally opposed by the seemingly underrepresented "her story." I am completely disinterested in tracing the origins of this smashingly clever jab at traditional historiography. However, there seems to be a more amusing correlation that occurs in the language from which the term 'history' actually comes from, Greek. The roots of ἱστορία (historia) and ὑστέρα (hystera) are very close. (Different systems of reading Ancient Greek words result in slight variations in pronunciation, but the similarity is undeniable.) Now, what does 'hystera' mean? You may recognize the root 'hystera' in words such as 'hysteria' and 'hysterical'. This term is, however, a much later development and will not be discussed here. In Ancient Greek, the word ὑστέρα ('hystera') meant 'womb'. The "his story/her story" opposition is strangely mocked by this proximity of "woman" and "history" in the very language in which historic works first appeared (or so we were taught). The point of this exercise is simple. False etymologies, puns and clever word-plays are not a good source of objective knowledge. At best, they may be used as mnemonic devices.

Extreme makeovers: Ancient style.

 
Friday, October 18, 2013, 15:05 - World History: Ancient, Medieval & Modern
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According to Cassio Dio's Roman History (58, 22), Sextus Marius, an incredibly wealthy Plebeian, once demonstrated his might to a neighbor in a rather unusual way. Marius invited the man (with whom he had a dispute) to stay with him as a guest for two days. On the first day, Marius had the neighbor's villa completely demolished. On the second day the villa was rebuilt on a much more impressive scale. Marius told the stupefied neighbor that he knew how to defend his interests and how to repay favors.

Marius' immense wealth ended up costing his life. In 33 A.D. the Emperor Tiberius, coveting his riches, had him condemned to death and thrown from the Tarpeian Rock.

Also found in A Cabinet of Roman Curiosities by J. C. McKeown.

Virgil Encyclopedia

 
Sunday, June 16, 2013, 11:12 - Books, dictionaries and texts
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My corrections for "The Virgil Encyclopedia" have gone through. A truly worthwhile endeavor. Just wish it was not so expensive! I am lucky to have the PDF proofs for future reference. Sadly, there will not be too many new projects like that resulting in paper books. That time has passed...

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