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Temple Church inscription

 
Ah, mysteries...

I decided to revisit a little mystery about an inscription on the church at Temple (not far from Rosslyn, if I am not mistaken).
The inscription can be seen in all its high-resolution glory here:
http://www.maknap.com/MysteryTV/history ... /STONE.JPG

A gentleman by the name of Jeff Nisbet attempted to prove that VAESAC stands for CAUSAE, and that MIHM stands for something like Maria Iesus Heres Magdalen (sic). The letters RI that one might believe are seen on the other side of the stone were interpreted by him as somehow referring to the Templars' pre-columbian voyages to America.

That sort of thing is enough to make one's brain hurt... Nevertheless, I found some additional information about this inscription in Notes and Queries (where else?).

In 1901 N&Q republished a note from Daily News:

The late Duchess of Cleveland, while Lady Dalmeny, was (says a correspondent) very much interested by the inscription, which has never been satisfactorily explained, which in letters of lead is on the stone of the belfry of the ruined ancient church of Temple, just outside the boundary of the Rosebery property in Midlothian. It reads thus: 'Vaesac Mihm." Daily News, 20 May.

Can any one suggest an explanation?
C.C.B.


In a few months this reply was received (9th S. VIII Aug.10, 1901):

Vaesac Mihm (9th S. viii. 45) - I believe that the inscription leaded into one of the corner stones in the east gable bellow the belfry of the old church at Temple reads

V.AE.S.A.C
M.I.H.M

There is a somewhat similar inscription, with a date on a stone in the gable of the very old stone-roofed portion of the church of Abercorn in Linlithgowshire, this: -
D.D.I.D.
M.H.I.M. 1612

J.L. Anderson


I find it interesting that these people, who undoubtedly saw the inscription in a better condition than it is today, did not note the letters RI that some believe exist now.

Other than that I can only honestly say that for a fee I am willing to produce absolutely any imaginable interpretation of the inscriptions above.

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