Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


Philosophic terminology in Latin

 
Sunday, February 8, 2009, 01:41 - Latin Translation, Latin Words - Meanings and Definitions, Philosophy
Posted by Administrator
I have published a first pass of a new word list: Philosophical terminology in Latin. It would is a nearly impossible task to come up with a comprehensive dictionary of Latin terms used in any particular setting. Philosophical Latin is highly technical and individual philosophers often adapted existing terms for their own needs. Still, it is my hope that this wordlist will be useful to someone just starting to read philosophic works in the original Latin. Most of these terms were used in medieval texts, because Ancient Rome never matched Greece as a center of philosophic studies. Roman philosophy was rather eclectic, even at its best (Lucretius, for example). This list of terms (over 500 entries!) generally only includes individual words and notions, leaving aside common sayings such as "Cogito ergo sum" etc. I am considering making a separate list of such phrases.

Philosophy: Latin terms with translations.


Geron corporation - does the name say it all?

 
Friday, January 23, 2009, 17:41 - Ancient Greek Language
Posted by Administrator
I have previously written about the use of ancient languages in modern company names: Company names: never boring!. So, here comes another one. Geron.

Geron is a Greek word that literally means "old one", "old man", "Elder". If you ask me, a pretty strange image for a company. Wouldn't one rather see the ideas of innovation and modernity to be oozing from a company that has anything to do with technology. According the the company website, "Geron is developing first-in-class biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases, including spinal cord injury, heart failure and diabetes." I have to assume that their initial interest in the name was influenced by the term "gerontology", but there is something nefarious in the face of the old man that appears in the company's promotional materials. The company's role in stem-cell research thus becomes something straight from sci-fi: (white) old men preying on the young. Well, we shall see...



"Love conquers all" in Norse runes

 
Friday, December 12, 2008, 16:34 - Best Latin Quotes, Words of Wisdom, Proverbs and Sayings, Poetry, Literature, Music
Posted by Administrator
Among a very entertaining collection of actual Norse runic love quotes there is one that comes from Virgil, the famous "Love conquers all":



omnia:uinciž:am(or):ęž:nos:cedamus:amor(i)
Omnia vincit amor, et nos cedamus amori
‘Love conquers all; let us too yield to love.’

I don't know what time the original inscription is attributed to, but the entire corpus is from 1150-1350. The discovery was made in Bergen, Norway.

See: Runic Love Quotes

Free PHI 5.3 (Collection of Latin texts from the Packard Humanities Institute)!

 
Tuesday, November 4, 2008, 20:17 - Books, dictionaries and texts, Software
Posted by Administrator
PHI 5.3 is a Latin language equivalent of Thesaurus Linguae Graecae. This package used to be licensed at a small cost to individuals. Not many people know this , but currently PHI 5.3 (as well as PHI 7) can be obtained freely from the Packard Humanities Institute. Here is a quote from the License Agreement:

These materials are intended for non-commercial scholarly use by universities and scholars. The CD ROMs are being made available by means of a license agreement with an indefinite term. The fact that we offer this license at no charge (including shipping & handling costs) reflects PHI's desire that the texts on the discs be available to all interested scholars and institutions for educational purposes.

A brief description:

PHI currently offers two CD ROMs of classical texts:
PHI CD #5.3 ("Latin", issued 1991) contains virtually all classical Latin literature through A.D. 200, together with a few later texts (e.g. Servius, Porphyry, Zeno, Justinian). As an extra bonus we have also included the following versions of the Bible: Hebrew, Septuagint, Greek and Coptic New Testaments, Latin Vulgate, King James, and RSV.
PHI CD #7 ("Greek Documentary", issued 1997) contains (1) documentary papyri prepared at Duke University with the help of the University of Michigan; (2) Greek inscriptions prepared at Cornell, Ohio State University, et al.; and (3) a Coptic New Testament prepared at Yale and the Nag Hammadi texts as prepared at the University of Claremont.


For everybody's convenience I am making the License agreement and the Order form available here (I have the Packard Humanities Institute's permission, of course):

PHI files


The best thing about PHI is that the texts are often taken from the best editions and their quality is quite impressive. This is not your usual TheLatinLibrary.com stuff which is all too often unusable for any serious reader of Classical texts.
Keep in mind, that you need to also find some software that is capable of displaying the text found on PHI CDs as well as Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG). I would recommend Musaios or Diogenes.


<<First <Back | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | Next> Last>>





Privacy Policy