Latin Quotes, Sayings, Tattoos, Phrases & Mottos

Most texts and materials on this site have to do with the Latin language, including its perception in popular culture: movies, tattoos, inscriptions, engravings, bits of ancient philosophy, online Latin resources and company names. There is also information about learning Latin and Greek: textbooks, dictionaries, DVDs and software that can be used in a homeschooling environment.


New Year's contemplation

 
James Carroll in an op-ed article "New Year's brooding" (Boston Globe, Dec. 31, 2007) writes the following:

"The word contemplation has a Latin root, suggesting "time with," as if in contrast to chronology as time alone."
http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/edito ... _brooding/

He goes on to develop some additional ideas based on this etymology. The trouble is that there is no connection between tempus and contemplation (which I am sure the author is implying). The word 'contemplatio' is akin to the word 'templum' (English "temple") which originally meant a large open space designated for auguries. Therefore, 'to contemplate' was to observe this space, in order to detect favorable or unfavorable signs, primarily based on the patters of birds' flight.

Honest mistake, no doubt. Too bad, there is no easy way to correct it. I don't think the Globe will be publishing a formal correction.

<<First <Back | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | Next> Last>>





Privacy Policy